Larsens Lost Water/Raft project

The Exhibition

 

‘Larsen’s Lost Water coincides with the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. The exhibition focuses on the ways that the relatively uncharted parts of the globe – the Polar Regions and the seas – are (mis)represented, through exploring context and how introducing an alien or unexpected object into a space affects both components’ readings. The exhibition plays with the dislocated object as cliché, metaphor and metonym in relation to climate change.’

 

Our Brief: The Raftonauts

 

‘We are inviting proposals for a sea going raft which will allow 7 people to cross the English Channel to attend an important event about climate change in Paris.’

 

Specifications:

 

  • Sailable, with adequate propulsion

  • Provide shelter at sea for a two-day period, and facilities to provide food and fresh water for this period.

  • Able to withstand four-foot waves

 

What I Learned

 

This was an intense, but enormously satisfying and fruitful collaboration. It demonstrated for me all the ways that group work, where members know there roles and trust the process, can produce a result that is greater than the sum of its parts.

 

Everyone brings strengths and weaknesses to a project. I tend to excel at practical, hands on, process oriented work, so naturally I tend to lean on these strengths when working on my own. Collaborating and problem solving with others whose strengths lie in different areas has widened my skills and given me new strategies to apply to my practice. For example, I find myself taking more notes and using indexes and other research tools to identify relevant material more effectively.

 

I found that this project tied in thematically with my individual practice which is concerned with the ways we frame, edit and sometimes dissociate from our experience. As I scoured lumber and scrapyards for a mast of suitable height, diameter and strength, I was struck by the old fashioned physicality of the task. We put our faith in science and technology to address potentially cataclysmic problems like climate change, when another frame involves a willingness to slow down, to run counter to the furious momentum of digitized culture.